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Friday, September 8, 2017

Creative new album from Swiss jazz trio VEIN entitled VEIN plays Ravel

Announcing an incredible and breathtakingly creative new album from Swiss trio, VEIN entitled VEIN plays Ravel.  Since forming more than 10 years ago, VEIN has played over 450 shows around the world, with many guests including Dave Liebman and Greg Osby.  Now, this genre-bending trio turns their focus towards the works of the impressionistic French  composer Joseph Maurice Ravel.  The album features one of Europe's greatest voices on the saxophone, Andy Sheppard.

Ravel is an obvious choice for VEIN.  One of the most enigmatic figures of classical music, his compositions share much common ground with their soundscape. Ravel lived in an era during which tradition transitioned into abstract modernity, just as VEIN breaks new ground without rejecting the traditional values of jazz. Likewise, Ravel encompassed many styles of music into his compositions including baroque, Spanish music and jazz. VEIN's influences are similarly multifaceted. 

Check out the video about the album here...


....and a video about working with Saxophonist Andy Sheppard here..

  




You can find out more on the official website: http://www.vein.ch/  

There certainly is no special need any more to mention the fact that today most jazz piano trios are deeply attached to musical interplay (even though this fact should never be taken for granted!)  And yet, even with the most subtle, most distinguished form of interplay, there is always one in the trio who plays the part of the primus inter pares – the pianist, of course (usually and by definition leader of the group).  

That's exactly where pianist Michael Arbenz, drummer Florian Arbenz and bassist Thomas Lähns come up with their own idea of musical interplay. In fact, what they aim to achieve with their music - their understanding of music - is nothing less than the greatest possible balance of their three voices - starting with the way they work out their own compositions and arrangements, and going right through to the soloistic parts, fully assigned to all three of them.  The result is a stupendous musical togetherness, packed with surprising melodic, rhythmic and dynamic turns, played with highest precision even in the most complex, distorted and twisted passages of their compositions, arrangements and solos.

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